Best Food and Tools for Campfire Cooking Roanoke Rapids NC

Camping Food - Information on camping food, including camp cooking tips, campfire cooking techniques, camp food ideas & camping cooking equipment and accessories.

Home Game Arcade
(919) 788-0666
8813 Gulf ct.
Raleigh, NC
Adrian Byrd Tennis
(828) 729-1061
2704 Tablerock Rd.
Lenoir, NC
First United Methodist Church
(704) 633-7209
217 S. Church Street
Salisbury, NC
Shred Wakening
(704) 258-5811
141 Honeysuckle Lane
Mooresville, NC
Stover's Martial Arts / Tai Chi Qigong
(910) 792-1762
3722 Carolina Beach Rd
Wilmington, NC
AMF Gastonia Lanes
(704) 867-7243
2201 E. Franklin Blvd.
Gastonia, NC
Fayetteville Soccer Club
(910) 482-4313
445 Treetop Drive
Fayetteville, NC
Little Aces Tennis Academy
(919) 332-2351
P.O. Box 2623
Wilmington, NC
Holiday Inn of Salisbury
(704) 637-3100
530 Jake Alexander Blvd. S.
Salisbury, NC
S.O.S. Officials
(704) 302-4605
6107 Lost Gate Lane
Waxhaw, NC

Best Food and Tools for Campfire Cooking

Provided By: 

Camping Food

Best food and tools for campfire cooking

Cooking while camping no longer means a can of beans and some bad coffee. You might be surprised by the gourmet meals you can whip up in the great outdoors with the help of the right camping food and campfire cooking tools.

Camping Food List

If you’re looking for camp cooking options for breakfast lunch and dinner, there are a few staples you’ll need. Take a look at our short list of items:

  • Dehydrated milk, eggs, oatmeal and bread give you great breakfast options. Swap syrup for brown sugar or bring some dehydrated fruit to cut down on space and mess.
  • Bouillon cubes, minute rice, bagels, cheese, pitas and tuna make great lunch options. Bring custom items (such as pizza toppings or a few veggies if you have space) to add flavor options and side dishes.
  • Pasta and pre-prepared sauces give you great options for dinner. Dehydrated soup mixes, frozen soups or even cans of soup or beans (if you have the room) are another easy way to go.

Don’t forget, you’ll also need easy-to-carry snacks such as granola bars, peanuts or trail mix, and plenty of water, tea, coffee or powdered juice for drinks.

Camping Cooking Equipment

No one wants to be lugging the entire contents of their kitchen to the campsite or on the hiking trail, so carefully consider which tools will help you with stovetop or campfire cooking, and which ones are just dead weight. Take a look at our suggestions:

  • A portable stove. Unless you’re planning some major hiking, a portable stove is a must for camp food. It will allow you to prepare meals more efficiently, whether boiling or frying. Just remember, the more powerful the stove, the heavier it will be.
  • Multifunctional pots and pans. Try a pot with a lid that doubles as a frying pan to save on space while maximizing your cooking options. Typically, you shouldn’t need more than two pots to cook up some great campfire fare.
  • Utensils. Bring only what you vitally ne...

Click here to read the rest of this article from