Bleeding Ashland KY

Bleeding is a health hazzard and if not treated properly can lead to infections, even death. Learn how to treat bleeding and stay safe in the great outdoors at Nomadik.com. Please read on for more detailed information in the following article.

Ushma Patel
(606) 324-4102
336 29th Street
Ashland, KY
Specialty
Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

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Dhruv Pandya
(606) 324-4102
336 29th Street
Ashland, KY
Specialty
Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

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Ross M Patton
(304) 691-1100
1600 Medical Center Dr
Huntington, WV
Specialty
Family Practice, Sports Medicine

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Charles E Giangarra
(304) 691-1200
1600 Medical Center Dr
Huntington, WV
Specialty
Orthopedic Surgery, Sports Medicine

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Glen P Imlay
(740) 886-9403
98 State St
Proctorville, OH
Specialty
Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

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Harry Jules Bell
(606) 324-4102
336 29th Street
Ashland, KY
Specialty
Family Practice, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

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Melissa Jugo Tinney
(304) 429-6755
1540 Spring Valley Dr
Huntington, WV
Specialty
Sports Medicine

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Gregory S Hendricks
(304) 691-1100
1600 Medical Center Dr
Huntington, WV
Specialty
Family Practice, Sports Medicine

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Jose Israel Ricard, MD
(304) 691-1100
1600 Medical Center Dr
Huntington, WV
Specialties
Family Practice, Sports Medicine-Family Practice
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Inst Sup De Cien Med De La Habana, La Habana, Cuba
Graduation Year: 1960
Hospital
Hospital: Cabell Huntington Hosp, Huntington, Wv; St Marys Hospital, Huntington, Wv
Group Practice: University Family Practice

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Stanley S Tao
(304) 525-6905
2828 1st Ave
Huntington, WV
Specialty
Orthopedic Surgery, Sports Medicine

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Bleeding

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Bleeding

Because the first cut isn't always the deepest

While climbing gloves, hiking boots and spelunking armor will help save your skin, even the most shielded nomad will end up with cuts or scrapes during an outdoor adventure. The dense forests of Kouchibouguac National Park have scratched many a hiker, climbers routinely return from Glacier National Park with a few telltale scars, and the slip of a Swiss army knife can draw blood. Knowing how to treat a cut and recognizing when it's time to hightail it to the hospital can make sure your scars are badges of honor, not reminders of a near-death experience.

Treatment

Unless the wound is abnormally deep, there are only two things to do when dealing with a cut: stop the bleeding and prevent infection.

  • Stop the bleeding: With severe bleeding, speed is more important than sterility.
    • Apply direct pressure to the wound, using a sterile dressing . If no dressing is nearby, use a rag, towel, piece of clothing or your hand.
    • Keep the dressing in place. Disturbing a wound can make it bleed more.
    • If blood soaks through, don't remove the dressing. Apply a new layer over top.
  • Prevent infection: Once the bleeding has stopped,
    • With clean hands, or wearing disposable gloves, clean the cut under running water.
    • If the wound is full of dirt or debris that won't rinse out, remove large pieces with sterile tweezers. Sterilize the tweezers, but not the wound, with rubbing alcohol, which kills live tissue ...

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