Burns Yuma AZ

Burns of all types can be serious health concerns, especially when travelling in the backcountry. Learn how to prevent and treat these health concerns at Nomadik.com. Please read on for more detailed information in the following article.

Ironwood Veterinary Clinic
(928) 726-5432
2632 S Avenue B
Yuma, AZ

Data Provided by:
Harry Richard Tennant, MD
Yuma, AZ
Specialties
General Practice
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Va Sch Of Med, Charlottesville Va 22908
Graduation Year: 1965

Data Provided by:
Manith Mann
(928) 782-6015
2120 W 24th St
Yuma, AZ
Specialty
Internal Medicine

Data Provided by:
Yuliuz Mustafa
(928) 336-2000
2400 S Ave A
Yuma, AZ
Specialty
Internal Medicine

Data Provided by:
Prafulla Chandra Anugu
(928) 726-2500
1210 W 24th St
Yuma, AZ
Specialty
Family Practice

Data Provided by:
Darrell Scheetz, DO
Yuma, AZ
Specialties
General Practice
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Kirksville Coll Of Osteo Med, Kirksville Mo 63501
Graduation Year: 1964

Data Provided by:
Ramonito Huevos Panal
(928) 317-3371
2555 E Gila Ridge Rd
Yuma, AZ
Specialty
Internal Medicine

Data Provided by:
Ruben Coriano
(928) 373-0233
682 S 4th Ave
Yuma, AZ
Specialty
Internal Medicine

Data Provided by:
Christopher R Moor
(928) 726-1122
1881 W 24th St
Yuma, AZ
Specialty
Internal Medicine

Data Provided by:
Trinidad Atayoc Lim
(928) 329-8331
1220 W 24th St
Yuma, AZ
Specialty
Internal Medicine, Nephrology

Data Provided by:
Data Provided by:

Burns

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Burns

Fahrenheit 451 gone wrong

Watching the night sky by a crackling campfire is heaven on earth for many outdoor enthusiasts. But when campfire safety doesn't come first, the consequences can be serious. We've all had a close call with singed hair, burned fingertips or scorched clothes, but second- and third-degree burns can lead to deadly infections.

Signs and Symptoms

To distinguish a minor burn from a serious burn, the first step is to determine the degree and the extent of damage to body tissues. The three classifications of burns will help you determine emergency care.

  • First-degree burn: These burns are the least serious, with only the outer layer of skin burned. First-degree burns are indicated by
    • Slight redness
    • Some swelling
    • Tolerable or no pain.
  • Second-degree burn: These burns go deeper, into the second layer of skin. Signs of second-degree burns include
    • Blistering
    • Intense redness
    • A splotchy appearance.
  • Third-degree burn: These are serious burns, penetrating through all layers of skin into the underlying tissue - fat, muscle and even bone may be affected. With third-degree burns,
    • The surface appears dry.
    • The skin can look waxy, leathery, or charred.
    • Nerve damage may result in little or no pain.

Treatment

For first- and small second-degree burns,

  • Cool the burn. Hold the burned area under cold running water for at least five minutes, or until the pain subsides. If this is impractical, immerse the burn in cold water or cool it with cold compresses.
  • Cover the burn with a sterile gauze bandage. Don't use fluffy cotton, which may stick to the skin. Wrap the gauze loosely to avoid putting pressure on the burned skin. Bandaging keeps air off the burn, reduces pain and protects blistered skin.
  • Dull the pain. Take an over-the-counter pain reliever. These include aspirin, ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, others), naproxen (Aleve) or acetaminophen (Tylenol, others). Never give aspirin to children or teenagers.
  • Monitor the burn. Watch for signs of infection, such as increased pain, redness, fever, swelling or oozing.

No matter what your grandmother told you,

  • Do not put butter on a burn.
  • Do not put ice on a burn. It can cause frostbite .
  • Do not break burn blisters. This can lead to infection.

For third-degree burns or second-degree burns covering a large area, call an ambulance. While you wait for help to arrive,

  • If the victim was burned in an uncontrolled fi...

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