Camping & Hiking Etiquette Bennington VT

Not all nature lovers have the same regard for their fellow campers as they do their environment. Green campers , who would never consider disturbing a desert flower, sometimes think nothing of disturbing the peace. To keep on the good side of other outdoor enthusiasts, follow a few simple guidelines.

Maple Grove Campground
(802) 849-6439
RR 104
Fairfax, VT
 
Mountain View Campground & Cottages
(802) 888-2178
RR 15
Morrisville, VT
 
Harvey's Lake Cabins & Campground
(802) 633-2213
190 Campers Ln
Barnet, VT
 
Trailside Lodge
(802) 422-3532
115 Coffeehouse Rd
Killington, VT
 
Nichols Lodge
(802) 253-2929
1900 Waterbury Rd
Stowe, VT
 
Malletts Bay Campground
(802) 863-6980
Malletts Bay
Colchester, VT
 
Shelburne Camping Area
(802) 985-2540
RR 7
Shelburne, VT
 
Camp Skyland
(802) 372-4200
398 South St
South Hero, VT
 
Farm & Wilderness Camps
(802) 422-3761
Killington, VT
 
Lakewood Campgrounds
(802) 868-7270
122 Champlain St
Swanton, VT
 

Camping & Hiking Etiquette

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Camping & Hiking Etiquette

Avoiding the enemy within (the campsite)

Not all nature lovers have the same regard for their fellow campers as they do their environment. Green campers , who would never consider disturbing a desert flower, sometimes think nothing of disturbing the peace. To keep on the good side of other outdoor enthusiasts, follow a few simple guidelines.

Campground Culture

Campgrounds, by their very nature, lack privacy. To help you keep the peace with your tenting neighbors:

  • Tote your trash. When you leave, be sure to clean up the site for the next round of campers. If you're staying more than a night or two, be sure to collect your trash and dispose of it properly at regular intervals to discourage four-legged visitors.
  • Noises Off. Observe the quiet times in the camp. Sound travels at night, so be sure to whisper and turn off generators, radios and other noise-spawning items. Also, try to arrive early enough to set up camp before others are trying to sleep.
  • Stick to the path. Taking shortcuts through other campsites is not only rude, but a great way to find yourself camping at the nearest motel. Respecting other campers' sites is essential if everyone is to have a good time in crowded conditions.
  • Go slow. Even if you're in a 4X4 that can handle rough terrain, be sure to observe the speed limit. Although the standard 15 mph seems like a snail's pace, it's there to protect children who may have more freedom than they do at home, as well as animals, cyclists, and your car's undercarriage.
  • Dish duty. If your campground has a drinking fountain or water source, it's not your personal dishwashing station. Come prepared with a bucket, wash basin and bio-degradable soap and wash your dishes at your campsite. Also, resist the urge to do the dishes in the bathroom sinks.
  • Share the showers. It's tempting to unwind under an endless stream of hot water after a day spent getting dusty and sore on the trails, but if you're lucky enough to have a campsite with hot showers, don't hog the water. Unless you've fallen into a tar pit, a 10-minute hose-down should be enough.
  • Food forethought. Leaving food unattended at your site is an open invitation to unwanted wildlife, and can make neighboring campers irate when they see a bear or raccoon coming too close for comfort.
  • Fish: Unless you're camping in the wilderness far from other campers, don't clean your catch at the campsite. Use the campground's fish-cleaning station or clean it where you caught it. Not only will the smell make you unpopular, fish offal, which is truly awful, is a magnet for wild animals looking for food.

Healthy Hiking Habits

Campsites aren't the only location where you need to mind your manners. When trekking the trails, you've likely been told to “take nothing but pictures and leave nothing but footprints.” While this is great advice for starters, knowing what to share and what to keep to yourself can make a ...

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