Choosing an Adventure Outfitter Hillsboro OR

Not all adventure outfitters are created equal. Choose the right outfitter by asking the right questions and spotting red flags. Please read on for more detailed information in the following article.

Take Shape for Life - Philip Mandel
(503) 887-0889
6135 SW Erickson Avenue
Bearverton, OR
 
Multnomah Athletic Club
(503) 223-6251
1849 SW Salmon Street
Portland, OR
 
Kayak Tillamook County, LLC
(503) 866-4808
PO Box 9132
Portland, OR
 
Portland Parks & Recreation
(503) 823-2223
1120 SW 5th Avenue
Portland, OR
 
Genesis Sports Nutrition LLC
(503) 387-3630
6018 SE Crown Court
Milwaukie, OR
 
YWCA of Greater Portland
(503) 294-7400
1111 SW 10th Avenue
Portland, OR
 
RiverPlace Athletic Club
(503) 221-1212
0150 S.W. Montgomery
Portland, OR
 
LA Fitness
(503) 228-2626
1115 NW 14th Ave
Portland, OR
 
Grieg Lodge at Norse Hall
(503) 236-3401
111 NE 11th Street
Portland, OR
 
RiverPlace Athletic Club
(503) 221-1212
0150 S.W. Montgomery
Portland, OR
 

Choosing an Adventure Outfitter

Provided By: 

Choosing an Adventure Outfitter

Look before you leap into an adventure

By Charmian Christie

Poking about websites to see what various outfitters offer is a start, but don't base your vacation plans on an online browse. If you can't visit the outfitter in person, at the very least pick up the phone and interview the prospective company. It's worth the long distance charges. After all, you're not merely booking a flight with these people. You could be living with them 24 / 7 for the duration of your vacation , so be sure you find a company that you can trust and makes you feel at ease.

Safety First

Your first hint of the outfitter's attitude toward safety will come from their brochures or website. Do they stress safety, or do they downplay it (or ignore it completely)? When interviewing, ask:

  • What safety equipment do they provide?
  • What precautions do they take? Can they answer your questions knowledgably?
  • What kind of first aid training do the outfitter's guides undergo? How often are they updated?

If, for any reason, you think they're only paying lip service to the legal safety requirements, end the interview and call the next outfitter on the list.

Equipment Evaluation

Ramshackle gear, moth-eaten sleeping bags and leaky tents can ruin an outdoor venture. Be sure to find out all the details:

  • What equipment is provided? What are you expected to rent or bring yourself?
  • How old is the equipment? Get brand and model information so you can check it out at a local store.
  • Does the guide use the same equipment as the clients? If so, it's likely good quality. If not, why the difference?

Tour Details

What good is your dream trek if you're led by uniformed guides and using inferior equipment in unsafe conditions? Once you're sure the outfitter is a competent and comfortable fit, pull out your wish list and ask for details.

  • If their tour descriptions aren't what you're looking for, do they offer custom tours?
  • What physical activities are involved? Get specifics. A “laid-back trek” to an outfitter might induce a heart attack in an out-of-shape couch potato. Find out:

    • How many miles will you hike / bike / canoe…
    • …and under what conditions? Will you be cycling 30 miles a day uphill, three miles on flat roads or trailblazing terrain on a mountain bike all day?
    • Will you be able to decline an activity if you find it too exhausting? Or once you start, are you committed to crossing the finish line?

Guides

Be sure to find out about the individual guide(s) who will conduct the tour. The person you're speaking to might not operate the excursion you have in mind. Be sure to ask:

  • Who will be assigned to your tour?
  • How experienced is this particular guide? How often have they led this specific trek?
  • What type of training do they have? You should hear safety mentioned at least once.

Professional Organizations

Is the company a member of a professional association l...

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